Individual Engagement Survey Results

Your individual employee engagement results are listed below. Explore the report to learn more about your individual engagement score and discover what your scores are for the common drivers of employee engagement.

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Melissa Herrett

Your Engagement Level

Disengaged

How engaged are you as compared to the U.S. workforce?

  • Disengaged
  • Under Engaged
  • Moderately Engaged
  • Fully Engaged

What do the engagement levels mean?

Fully Engaged employees love their jobs and the organizations they work for. They really wouldn't want to work anywhere else, and will voluntarily put in lots of extra effort to help the organization succeed.

Moderately Engaged employees generally like their jobs and the organizations they work for, though they might leave if they got a job offer from somewhere else. They will "go the extra mile" when it seems necessary, but don't always give the job their very best.

Under Engaged employees are ambivalent about their jobs and the organizations they work for. Many are looking for other jobs, and most would leave if they got any suitable offer. They may put in extra effort occasionally, but generally just do what's needed to meet basic job requirements.

Disengaged employees have mostly negative feelings about their jobs and the organizations they work for. Most would jump at the chance to take another job if they could find one. Because of their negative feelings, Disengaged employees see little point in doing more than the minimum required to "get by."

How did you score on the common drivers of engagement?

Common Drivers Strongly Disagree To Strongly Agree

What actions can I take to improve my engagement levels?

  • Consider asking your manager what additional training/education or additional job duties might help increase your future compensation.
  • Work at finding ways to "streamline" your job activities, and becoming more efficient at what you do. If you are able to significantly reduce the amount of time and effort you need to put in to get your job done, you'll likely end up feeling better about your compensation.
  • Ask your manager or Human Resources Representative to provide you with information about the true value of your total compensation package. This includes what the company pays toward your insurance, 401k contributions, the dollar value of vacation/sick time, company-paid FICA and Unemployment Taxes, etc. You will probably be quite surprised at how much the organization pays toward these things that don't show up in your paycheck.
  • Make a list of times/situations when you have felt a strong sense of accomplishment at work. Share the list with your manager and ask him/her to consider giving you tasks/assignments that would allow you to experience a similar sense of accomplishment more often.
  • If there are specific tasks or parts of your job that you feel are not a good use of your time or skills, discuss these with your manager. He/she may be able to re-assign some of them to someone else or help you find ways to get them done more efficiently.
  • Identify what you think are the most important skills/abilities that you bring to your job. Ask a trusted co-worker for feedback on what they see as your key strengths. Then talk with your manager about how these strengths/abilities could be more fully utilized at work.
  • Start a folder where you save notes, emails, etc. that you have received acknowledging your contributions or recognizing your performance. Periodically review these to remind yourself of what you have accomplished and that your efforts have been noticed and appreciated.
  • Meet with your manager to discuss your short and longer-term career goals, what you will need to achieve them and what he/she can do to support your career development.
  • Carefully determine the specific growth and development goals you hope to achieve over the next 12 months. Write them down and assess your progress towards achieving them at least once each month.
  • Ask your manager or Human Resources Representative about your organization's tuition reimbursement policies or budget available for outside training/education. Enroll in a job-related course or training program through a college, online course or other institution/resource.
  • Seek out a mentor who has successfully navigated the career path you want to pursue. Ask your mentor for career guidance and support on a regular basis.
  • Investigate training or career development opportunities that may be available within your organization. Seek advice about which opportunities may be most appropriate for you from others – including your manager, peers, and Human Resources Representative.
  • Make an effort to attend Town Hall Meetings with senior leadership to gain full knowledge of their vision, direction and strategic plan for the organization.
  • Ask your manager to review with you what he/she knows about the organization's future direction and its strategy for ensuring future success. Find out what excites them about the organization's vision and future direction. Discuss how you fit into that direction and what you need to do to make it successful.
  • If you work for a publicly traded company, review its Annual Reports (often available via an Investors tab on the company's web page) for information about the company's performance and future direction.
  • Search online for your organization's name to find press releases, articles, analysts' reviews, social media posts, etc. that shed light on your organization's performance, reputation, and public image among the population at large ( and the investment community in particular if your organization is publicly traded).
  • Consider giving your manager a summary of things you have accomplished each month. Ask if anything stands out as something where you did great work.
  • Schedule a meeting with your manager where you can ask for performance feedback and discuss what you're doing well.
  • Make a habit of regularly thanking co-workers for things they do that help you or that contribute to your team's success. Do your best to model and reinforce peer-to-peer recognition on your team. Your peers will likely follow your lead and more frequently express appreciation for what you do.
  • Make a habit of thanking your manager for things he/she does to help you or that contribute to your team's success. He/she is likely to reciprocate (maybe not immediately, but over time you can help your manager become better at expressing appreciation).
  • Start a folder where you save notes, emails, etc. that you have received acknowledging your contributions or recognizing your performance. Periodically review these to remind yourself of what you have accomplished and that your efforts have been noticed and appreciated.